WEDNESDAY 6PM — 9PM

from April 3
to May 15

$300 Course fee + $60 material fee

7 class sessions
+ student showcase on June 1st

dadageek hq

2015 East Riverside Dr
Building 7BA

Austin, Texas 78741

 
 
class information
 
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why spatial sound?


Expressively performing electronic music and sound art is challenging, but sensing and spatialization are two key tools in creating engaging electronic performance pieces. Sensors such as video tracking and gyroscopes allow us to precisely track human movement, translating performative action to an audience through direct interaction of movement to sound.

Additionally, spatial sound is quickly becoming the standard in experimental and popular electronic music, capable of fully immersing audiences in multi-dimensional sound planes. Through the intertwining of movement, timber, and spatialization, artists have the ability to create genuinely unique and fully immersive performances and tech art installations. 

 
 
 

This intermediate level course is focused on generating multichannel sound environments using realtime body tracking and motion sensor technology. Multichannel sound, also referred to as ambisonic or surround sound, is becoming the standard for creating immersive sonic environments for installation and performance. We will be investigating the use of multichannel spatial sound techniques combined with reading realtime sensor data generated by body movement and location. Students will have the opportunity to work with an internationally recognized dance company to sense and interpret movement for proposes of synthesizing and spatializing sound in realtime.

 
 
 

WHO IS THIS CLASS FOR?

Practicing new media artists and musicians who want to introduce spatial sound and realtime sensor technology into their work. Participants should possess a foundational understanding of either working with sound, programming in Max, or working with sensors.

 
 
 

The class culminates with each student creating an individually or collaboratively designed digital performance or interactive work to display at the dadageek showcase. You can check out past showcase performances here.

 
 
 

WHAT WILL I LEARN?

Key skills 

 

+ Reading and interpreting a variety of sensors including cameras and accelerometers

+ Creating complex synthesized sounds in Max/MSP

+ Working with hardware and software to spatialize sound on multichannel systems

+ Communicating with video-based software like Touchdesigner

+ OSC and MIDI communication between software

 
 
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WHAT DO I NEED TO KNOW?

Requirements

 

An introductory level of programming in software such as Arduino, Max/MSP or processing is recommended. Previous experience with audio hardware/software is beneficial.

You should be a practicing artist who wants to augment your work/performance with spatial sound

 
 
 

WHAT DO I NEED TO BRING?

Materials

 

Students should bring:

  • Laptop with Max Installed

dadageek in-class supplies include:

  • Soldering workstations and tools

  • Quadrophonic sound system

  • Audio hardware

Materials fee will supply you with (for you to keep!):

  • A Teensy micro-controller

  • Prototyping breadboard and PCBs

  • A sensor kit with 37 sensors

  • Power supply and USB cable

 
about your instructor
 
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"I consider myself a musician & a new media artist. I incorporate sound and composition into my installations and my performances."

— KYLE EVANS

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Kyle Evans is a new media artist, sound designer, electronic instrument creator, educator, and performer. His collective work ranges from music technology development to new media installation.

He has invented many electronic musical and video instruments ranging from studio-based synthesizers to performance-based computer interfaces.

 
 
 
 
 
 

He has performed and presented his work throughout the United States and Europe including Transmediale in Berlin, the International Computer Music Conference at Columbia University, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Blanton Museum of Art, and the GLI.TC/H festival in Chicago.

 
 

Still have questions?